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Bonds Investments

Taxation on Gains from Bond Investment in India

  In India, bonds are financial instruments that are used to raise capital by companies, financial institutions, and government entities. They are essentially debt instruments that provide a fixed rate of return to the investor. Under the Indian Income Tax Act, the interest income earned on bonds is treated as taxable income and is subject to tax at the applicable rate. The interest income earned on bonds is added to the total income of the individual or entity and taxed accordingly. However, there are certain types of bonds that are exempt from tax under the Income Tax Act. For example, interest earned on government securities, such as the National Savings Certificate (NSC), Kisan Vikas Patra (KVP), and Public Provident Fund (PPF), are exempt from tax. In this article, we will discuss about Taxation on Gains from Bond Investment in India.   Taxation on Gains from Bond Investment in India   Bond investors check many parameters while investing in bonds, such as a coupon, frequency of coupon payments, maturity & yield. Important factor to be considered in bond investment is “taxation on gains from bond investment. Few important points that need to be considered before taxation on gain from bond are:   Bonds provide coupon payments and return principal amount on maturity. Firstly, the coupon payments are the gains from bond investment; hence they are taxable. Secondly, you may sell bonds in the secondary market before maturity, or you may hold bonds till maturity. In either of the cases, if there is capital gain, then the gains are taxable.   The bonds listed on the National Stock Exchange are Listed Bonds, and bonds that are not listed on the National Stock Exchange are called Unlisted Bonds.   Short Term Capital Gain Tax is applicable if you sell listed bonds before 12 months (it is 36 months in the case of unlisted bonds).   Long Term Capital Gain Tax is applicable if you hold listed bonds for more than 12 months or hold unlisted bonds for more than 36 months.   TDS will not be deducted on interest received from Listed Bonds & Debentures.   Slab system defines the tax rate applicable to individuals considering age and income. Individuals can be Resident or Non-Resident or HUF or Association of Person (AOP) or Body of Individual (BOI) or any other Artificial Juridical Person (AJP). The applicable tax rate is called the slab rate.   Taxation of bonds in India as follows   1.  Regular Taxation of Bonds in India – Interest earned from Bonds is taxed as per marginal slab rate, and the maximum slab rate is 30 %. Appreciation of the bond price is considered as capital gain and taxed accordingly. If these bonds are held for the long term (more than 12 months for listed bonds and more than 36 months for unlisted bonds), the capital gain tax will be 10 %. Short-term capital gain tax can be 5% to 30%. Example – Mr. Suresh is a senior citizen aged 65. He has invested Rs. 10 lakhs in listed bonds. The coupon rate, i.e., interest rate, is 10% paid annually. His annual income is 9 lakhs. So, he comes under the 20% slab rate Investment amount – 10,00,000 Coupon rate -10% Annual Interest income – 1,00,000  Tax on interest income:- 1,00,000 * 20% = Rs 20,000 Suresh has to pay Rs. 20,000 taxes on interest income every year till maturity or till he resells bonds STCG Tax – Suppose after 10 months, if he sells bonds for Rs.10,50,000, then the capital appreciation is Rs.50,000 Tax on STCG – 20% X 50,000 = Rs 10,000 LTCG Tax – Suppose after three years, if he sells bonds for Rs. 13,00,000, then the capital appreciation is Rs. 3, 00, 000 Tax on LTCG – 10% X 3,00,000 = Rs 30,000 Note – i) Indexation benefits can be availed only in the case of inflation-indexed bonds or capital indexed bonds. ii) The income should be listed under the ‘income from other sources’ section in your income tax forms   Tax Free Bonds   In the case of Tax- free bonds, the interest earned from bonds is not taxed, but price appreciation of the bonds during maturity (or sale) is considered as capital appreciation. Hence capital gain taxes are applicable. Considering the holding period, either LTCG or STCG, will be applicable.   Tax Saving Bonds   Section 54EC Bonds are Capital Gain Tax Exemption Bonds that provide 100% tax exemption on the long-term capital gain earned by selling any property. These bonds are the best options to save tax after the property sale. But conditions apply, such as the time gap between property sale and bond investment cannot exceed six months. Also, the investment limit in Section 54EC Bonds is 50 lakhs. Section 54EC Bonds do not provide any exemption on short term capital gains. Note – i) Interest earned on tax exemption bond will be taxable as per the slab rate of the individuals. Income should be listed under the ‘income from other sources’ section in your income tax forms. ii) There is a lock-in-period of 5 years on these exempted 54EC bonds from the date of purchase of bonds, if these bonds are sold before 5 years from date of purchase then the LTCG exempted earlier will be taxable in the hands of assessee. Even if any loan or security is taken against these bonds will be treated as redemption & LTCG exempted earlier will be taxable.   Example – An immovable property is sold at Rs. 85 lakhs after a period of 42 months from the date of acquisition. The indexed cost of acquisition is 52 lakhs and indexed cost of improvement is Rs. 13 lakhs. Calculate the capital gain that is taxable after claiming exemption under Section 54EC if investment amount is Rs. 22 lakhs invested in NHAI bonds within 6 months from date of sale of immovable property Particulars Amount (Rs) Sale Consideration 85,00,000 Less: indexed cost of acquisition 52,00,000 Less: indexed cost of improvement 13,00,000 Long Term Capital Gain 30,00,000 Less: Investment in NHAI

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Investment Strategy

Investment Strategy for Beginners – how to plan, save & invest in different segment

In this article, we will discuss about Investment Strategy for Beginners.   Investment Strategy for Beginners   As an investor, you need to follow the below steps before starting your investment journey which are as follows:   First of all, you have to prepare your per month income & expense sheet to have a better understanding. For example –  If your per month income is Rs 40,000 per month & household & other expenses is Rs 25,000 per month then your saving is Rs 15,000 per month.   a) There is a General Thumb Rule which says – An Individual needs to save & invest at least 15-20% of their salary. So, for example – If your salary is Rs 30,000 per month then you should save & invest at least Rs 4,500 to 6,000.   b) The Second Thumb Rule says – An individual need to invest (100 – their current age) in equity investments such as equity oriented mutual fund, shares etc. & the balance amount in debt fund or secured investment fund. So, for example – If your age is 30 then 100-30 = 70% of your investment should be part of your equity investment & balance 30% should be part of your debt & fixed investment.   c) It is a general tendency in India that after getting their salary credited to their account, the individual first pays their essential expenses as required & then they spend the balance amount on their own luxuries & after that any amount left with them, they will save & invest (Income – Expense – Personal spend = Savings). This is the wrong approach to save money, the ideal scenario will be Income – Savings (which should be equal to 15-20% of their income) = Expenses & Personal Spend.   d) Remember, there is no point having a large sum of money to be sitting idle in your saving bank account because the rate of interest in saving account is largely 2-3 % which will depreciate your money & also decrease your purchasing power. India Inflation rate is around 5-6% annually, so if you put your money idle in saving bank account it will depreciate your money & also will reduce your purchasing power because the things which can afford at present will become expensive in the future years to come due to inflation rate. Since your savings which barely gets a interest rate of 2-3% will reduce your money & purchasing power considerably.   e) Always remember you just don’t have to save the money but have to invest accordingly to get the desired return to build your wealth.   Investment Procedure   1. Set Your Objectives – Set your objective before starting your investment. Whether you want to invest for short time period (say < 3 years) or you want to invest for long time period (say > 3 years). Setting long tern horizon can be a great benefit when investing in Mutual Fund & Share Market. Your investment portfolio will grow based on factors such as the amount of capital invested, the tenure of investment & the net annual earning on capital. Hence, it is advisable to begin investing as early as possible as it helps you to save a significant amount of money & enjoy the power of compounding on your investment.   2. Find what is your risk tolerance (risk appetite) capacity? The types of investments you choose will depend greatly on your risk tolerance (risk appetite). The best way to identify the risk is to conduct a comprehensive comparison between the different schemes of Investment. Doing so will enable you to figure out what levels of risk each product holds & you can invest money accordingly. Generally, there are 3 types of investors having risk taking capacity are classified: a) Low risk-taking investors b) Moderate risk-taking investors c) High risk-taking investors   3. Whether adequate amount of emergency fund has been kept in place if required by the investors? Generally emergency fund needs to be kept of around 6-8 months of individual earning of one month salary. Emergency fund has to be highly liquid assets, so that int can be withdrawn anytime 24*7. It is preferable to keep Emergency fund in Fixed Deposits as it is highly liquid assets.   4. Whether proper cover has been taken by the investor by securing his life through any Life Insurance Policy or a Term Plan & proper Health Insurance Policy? It is preferable for any investor that before starting your investment journey, you should have an ideally 1 or 2 Life Insurance policy or 1 Term Plan (in case of dependency level on earning member of the family is more). It is also advisable to have a adequate health insurance policy to be taken in the name of main earning member of the family & health insurance should cover his spouse & children also, If any.   5. Based on the risk appetite & also considering investment diversification in mind, Investor should first invest their money in safe investment mode having fixed Rate of Return (RR) generating capacity which will give them a fixed RR & also the compounding effect on their return in the long run. Always remember its the inflation adjusting return that you actually earn, hence you should invest in that investment instrument that give you inflation adjusted return.   Tips for smart Investment   a) It is preferable to first invest in fixed investment returns such as Public Provident Fund (PPF), National Pension Scheme (NPS) & Post Office Deposit Scheme.   b) Investment in fixed investment return gives you security of fixed earning even in dynamic & adverse situation which is guaranteed. Investment in PPF & NPS not only gives you the guaranteed returns but you can also claim deduction under section 80C & 80CCD (1B) of the Income Tax Act, 1961 amount to Rs 1,50,000 & Rs 50,000 at the time of filing of your Income Tax Return in the

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